Planning Applications

If the property you’re searching for is to the RIGHT of the dotted red line in the map below then 

BUT

If the property you’re searching for is to the LEFT of the dotted red line then

Map of Parish

Planning and how it works in the parish
The Parish Council is not a Planning Authority and therefore does not determine planning applications. In the civil parish of Newby and Scalby there are two organisations which carry out a decision-making role in planning applications – Scarborough Borough Council and the North York Moors National Park.  If you live in the national park then all planning applications are determined by the North York Moors National Park.  If you live outside the national park, then they are determined by Scarborough Borough Council.

Regardless of who decides a planning matter in the parish, both Scarborough Borough Council and the North York Moors National Park manage planning applications along broadly the same lines – each manages the planning process for their area and receives, assesses and approves/rejects planning applications.

Also each authority has a long term ‘Local Plan’. Once adopted the Local Plan is a statutory document which sets out planning policy for the next 15 to 20 years and forms the basis for determining planning applications. There’s more on Local Plans further down the page.

So what’s the Parish Council’s role in all this?  We’re formally consulted by Scarborough Borough Council and the North York Moors National Park on all planning applications within the Parish.  When the Council receives a letter of consultation, the Clerk informs all councillors of the details.  The application is then considered at the next Parish Council meeting.

The days of being able to study paper plans are, unfortunately, long gone – everything is now online. The Clerk downloads relevant plans from the planning sections of the Scarborough Borough Council or North York Moors National Park websites and prints them off on A3 paper so they can be studied in detail.

Members of the public are encouraged to attend Parish council meetings and make representations, especially if the particular application affects them; all comments made are listened to by the Council and taken into account when the Council agrees its formal reply.

Some of the areas the Council looks at on a planning application are:

  • The proximity to neighbouring boundaries.
  • Design of the application against other properties in the area.
  • Street scene (how it will look from the street it is in).
  • Scale of the design.
  • Suitability of the proposed use
  • Impact on the surrounding area
  • Topography, and in some cases any tree preservation orders.

The Council agrees its comments and the Clerk notifies the planning authority. Objections have to be based on material planning considerations so, if Council has objected to an application, the grounds for objection will be referred to in Council’s comments.

Once the planning application is being considered by the planning officer or planning committee of the higher authority, then it is for them to ensure the material considerations relevant to any particular application are weighed in the final decision process according to their seriousness and relative importance.

The Local Plan
Once adopted a Local Plan is a statutory document which sets out planning policy for the next 15 to 20 years and forms the basis for determining planning applications. It will include which sites will be released from the greenbelt and will be developed.

Scarborough Borough Council’s Local Plan runs from 2011 to 2032. It intends that circa 1400 new homes are built in the next 10 years or so; 1200 are in Scalby (with just over 1100 on greenbelt sites on the outskirts of Scalby). The other 200 are in Newby (or just over the boundary) but less than 60 will be on greenbelt land. These proposals will increase the population of the parish by somewhere between 35% and 40%.

The North York Moors National Park’s Local Plan runs from 2016 to 2035. It does not show there are plans for any large developments, hence any new homes are likely to result from the conversion of existing buildings.